Vintage Food: Homebrewing Mead

Last fall, Boyfriend and I experimented with brewing. We made several gallons of hard cider and a couple smaller batches of mead. While we’d finished off the cider over the winter, mead is supposed to age a bit longer before consuming, so we just this week opened up our first bottle of homebrewed mead.

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Well, apparently we bottled it before it had totally depleted its sugar because there was a little pop when we pushed off the stopper and tiny bubbles when we poured it. It was just a basic recipe of honey, water, white wine yeast, and a few raisins for extra nutrients. We used a yeast that a friend of ours recommended that yields a sweeter wine, so the finished mead is quite sweet and retains a lot of the honey character. We had used pasteurized local wildflower honey, so there’s a bit of floral character under all the sweetness. It has a strong yeasty smell, but not as much of that translates into the taste. And the bubbles are adorable.

I really enjoyed it with the two somewhat greasy meals we had Tuesday and Wednesday evenings. The first was leftover fried chicken, and the second were local lamb sausages. The sweetness of the mead went rather nicely with the greasy saltiness of the meats. I know it doesn’t sound very appetizing, but it was.

And I could definitely see this as a “sitting and sipping” drink on the porch if it were properly chilled. We also have a batch of cherry melomel (mead with fruit) aging in the cellar, so I’ll have to try that soon. I’m thinking in June when the cherries come out. That one is a bit more special because the pulp from the cherries meant we got less beverage from that batch. I think next time I’ll use cherry juice, or else strain the cherry puree before adding it to the honey mixture. And I’m considering experimenting with some drier yeasts to see if we can keep the honey flavor without quite so much sugar.

But all in all, mead-making was a success!

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