Beauty Review: Moonlit Skincare Midnight Shift Facial Oil

So I have a bit of a backlog of beauty products that I’ve tested and thought I’d make this week a bit of a Beauty Week on the blog. Come back later this week for more beauty reviews!

NB: I purchased this product with my own money and have been provided no incentive to affect my review. All opinions are my own. All links are non-affiliate links.

I mentioned this oil in my recent round-up of skincare things I’ve been loving, but I thought it merited a deeper review. I first saw Moonlit Skincare on Instagram and loved their peaceful photo aesthetic, but was a bit concerned about the ingredients in their star product, the Midnight Shift Facial Oil. I’m very wary about olive oil in products because it’s caused breakouts for me in the past. But I was in the market for a new facial oil after realizing that I prefer facial oil to watery serums after my hydrating toner, and wanting to find something a bit less dear to use when my Herbivore Phoenix Oil runs out. So I went conservative and bought the 14-day trial kit.

This kit comes with two 5-ml vials of the facial oil. Each one is supposed to last a week, but I got two full weeks’ worth of use out of one vial, and was so hooked that I decided to save my second vial for an upcoming trip and go ahead and buy a full-sized bottle. I used the oil as directed, dispensing about a dime-sized amount into the palm of my hand, spreading it quickly over my palms, and pressing it into my skin after using my watery hydrating products at night. I sometimes tent my hands over my nose and just inhale the beautiful, relaxing scent. It smells a bit like lavender Earl Grey tea, which you know I love. The oil absorbs fairly quickly, but still provides enough slip for a little jade rolling after application.

Since it’s been so humid, I find that this oil is all I need for a last step to seal in hydration and moisturize my skin at night, but if I need a bit more oomph, I will follow it with a cream. I find the scent fades quickly once I’ve put it on my skin, so I don’t know how much the aromatherapy helps me fall asleep, but the ritual of applying it is relaxing and helps me unwind.

All in all, this is a beautiful facial oil, at a fantastic price for a blended oil, with a lovely scent. I’ve already repurchased it since my first purchase, and will continue doing so in the future!

Tea Review: Matchaeologist Meiko Matcha

NB: I purchased this product without any review discount, and while I am a Matchaeologist affiliate, all links in this review are non-affiliate links. If you would like to support this blog by buying through my affiliate link, click here.

Those of you who follow me on Instagram have probably noticed that I’ve become very enamoured of the matcha latte as of late. When I decided to try to cut down on my sugar intake in June, that meant finding a recipe for an unsweetened matcha latte that still gave me the satisfaction of the sweet version. Of course, it also meant that I couldn’t get by with low-quality matcha powder and rely on the sugar to cover off flavors. So I went back to Matchaeologist to try more of their matchas. I’d previously reviewed the Matsu matcha, which is like their some what “standard” ceremonial grade matcha. But at $24 for 20g, it would be an expensive latte matcha. So I went back and purchased their Meiko ceremonial-grade matcha and Midori culinary-grade matcha.

I found the Meiko matcha delightful in an unsweetened matcha latte made with local goat’s milk, but found that when I tried to make a non-dairy matcha latte, I still needed the sweetener to cover the odd flavor of the non-dairy milk, so I opted for the less expensive Midori. But, still having some of the Meiko around, and not wanting to waste, I decided to try it straight for a bowl of thin matcha. It is, after all, still a ceremonial-grade matcha.

The matcha is the same intense green color and smooth texture of other Matchaeologist matchas. I do sift it, though I doubt I need to. It whisks up into a beautiful, stable foam in my ceramic matcha bowl. I used two chashaku scoops to about 2 fl. oz. of hot water to make my morning bowl.

The flavor and aroma are markedly different from the Matsu. While Matsu smells of vegetables and the sea, Meiko is subtler, more delicate, and lighter. Meiko still has the smoothness of Matsu, but without the thick mouthfeel. And the flavors are more floral than vegetal. I actually find it an absolutely lovely morning bowl of matcha, and for $14 for 20g, I will absolutely be buying this again.

Stay tuned because I will soon be reviewing the Midori culinary grade matcha, and sharing my recipes for perfect matcha lattes.