Tasting Tuesday: 2002 Tai Lian “Kunming Tea Market Opening” Anniversary Raw Puerh from Yunnan Sourcing’s “Intro to Puerh”

Today I’m finishing off the third in my series of raw puerhs from Yunnan Sourcing’s “Intro to Puerh” sampler. This week’s tasting is of the set’s aged raw puerh, which is the 2002 Tai Lian “Kunming Tea Market Opening” Anniversary Cake. I was particularly excited to taste this teas because I’ve been intrigued by aging and the effects of aging on teas. Next, I want to try different years of the same tea, which I happen to have from Crimson Lotus. But on to this tasting.

2002 Raw

I used 7.5 grams in a 120-ml gaiwan with water at 190F. I noticed aromas of henna and caramelized sugar from the dry leaf. I rinsed it and then steeped eleven times, starting with a ten-second steeping and increasing by five seconds each steeping until the last three steepings, which were one minute, ninety seconds, and two minutes. After a rinse, I got aromas of smoke from the gaiwan lid and fruitcake from the wet leaf.

After the first steeping, the gaiwan lid had an almost Lapsang-level of smoke aroma and the wet leaf had a light smoky aroma and some sugar. The liquor was whisky colored and smelled of Islay whisky. It had a medium-light body with no dryness or bitterness and a light fruity flavor. The second steeping started to open up more, with both lid and leaf smelling of smoke and peat. The liquor was slightly darker with a prune aroma. It was still a medium-light mouthfeel with a bit more dryness and the bitterness started coming through. It was a citrus-peel bitterness. The steeping reminded me of fruitcake soaked in good whisky.

By the third steeping, the leaf had started to smell a bit greener, though the lid was still smoky. The liquor was a darker amber color with a smoky aroma. There was more citrus peel bitterness and I noticed the smoke coming through in the flavor more. I could feel some sort of body sensation but couldn’t quite put my finger on what. The fourth steeping brought less smokiness and more fruitcake into the aroma and I felt like the bitterness was evolving. By the fifth steeping, I was noticing a long sweetness behind the bitterness and the sixth steeping brought an interesting bright astringency.

The seventh steeping felt like it had mellowed. I wrote that it’s “just kind of warm and cozy,” with a bright citrus peel flavor and a little tingle. On the eighth steeping, I noticed a bit of anise aroma and a tiny hint of maple in the flavor. I pushed it on the ninth, tenth, and eleventh steepings because I could tell the flavor was starting to fade, but I was still enjoying it. I noticed it mellow into a creamy mouthfeel with flavors of sweet fruits. The tenth steeping had a lovely viscosity to the mouthfeel and a sugar sweetness, but by the eleventh steeping it was obviously done.

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The spent leaves show a slightly varied color, ranging from olive green to tan, with more broken leaves. I found this tea very interesting and I’m really curious to try it again in silver.

Tuesday Tasting: 2014 Yunnan Sourcing Wu Liang Mountain Wild Arbor Raw Pu-erh from “Intro to Pu-erh”

Today, I’m continuing my tasting of the raw pu-erhs in Yunnan Sourcing’s “Intro to Pu-erh” sampler with their single estate raw pu-erh, the 2014 Wu Liang Mountain Wild Arbor raw pu-erh. Once again, this sample is a piece taken off a larger cake, and the sampler includes 25g of this tea, so I can taste it a few times. I tasted it in gaiwan for these notes.

2014 Raw

I used 7.26 grams in a 120-ml gaiwan with 190F water. After warming my teaware, I got aromas of henna, cardamom, and earth off the dry leaf. I did a rinse and then noticed aromas of fruit and woodsmoke from the wet leaf. I steeped this ten times, starting at ten seconds and increasing by five seconds each steeping, until a final steeping of a minute.

The first steeping gave off aromas of woodsmoke, fruitcake, and plums from the gaiwan lid and the wet leaf itself. The liquor was gold with a henna aroma. It had a medium-light body with no bitterness. There was a faint juiciness to the flavor, with initial notes of cardamom and ginger and a peach or apricot aftertaste. The second steeping, the liquor darkened slightly to an apricot color. The wet leaf smelled of green wood smoke and henna and the liquor had a faint fruity aroma. This steeping got a tiny bit of hoppy bitterness started, with some apricots (a blend of dried and fresh). I already started noticing a languid energy to this tea, and the cup had a sweet herbal aroma.

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The third steeping, the liquor darkened a bit more. The gaiwan lid had a henna aroma while the wet leaf had a sandalwood aroma. The liquor had a very balanced smooth bitterness, a lubricating mouthfeel, and an aftertaste of apricots and smoke. The fourth steeping brought out more smoke aromas from the liquor, and a light bitterness on the flavor and additional notes of smoky whisky and sweetness. It had an aromatic herbal finish. By the fifth steeping, I noticed the smokiness fading and the fruit coming forward. I got aromas of fresh, ripe apricots. The bitterness was also fading, with aromatic herbal flavors coming forward and a sweet aftertaste.

The sixth steeping, I started noticing an incense-y aroma off the leaves and a tip-of-the-tongue bitterness that reminded me of grapefruit peel, with a lighter mouthfeel. The seventh steeping have a beautiful balanced bitterness and aromas of incense and fruitcake. By the eighth steeping, I noticed the aromas fading somewhat, though it still had a nice apricot aroma on the liquor. The bitterness was fading, though the fruitiness remained and it had an anise aftertaste. By the ninth steeping, the aromas and flavors were still fading, and by the tenth steeping, it was obviously done.

The wet leaves were an even olive color, with some smaller leaves and buds.

Tuesday Tasting: 2015 Menghai Tea Factory 7542 Recipe Raw Puerh from Yunnan Sourcing’s “Intro to Puerh”

This week, I’m starting a little series where I share tastings from the puerhs in Yunnan Sourcing’s sampler called “Introduction to Puerh.” I got this after my stitch and sip video where I was thinking that I should learn more about puerh. I’ve had really good luck with Yunnan Sourcing’s curated oolong samplers, so I figured they’d do a good job with a puerh sampler. The sampler has six different teas, half ripe and half raw puerh, with examples of each from a classic recipe, a single estate, and an aged sample. The aged samples are both older than fifteen years.

2015 Raw

So on to this tea. The 2015 Menghai raw is a piece taken off a larger cake. I used 7.4g in a 120-ml gaiwan with water at 190F. The dry leaf, as you can see, is slightly broken from the compression into the cake, and has a medium-deep brown color with some lighter bits. It looks to have small leaves. After warming my teaware and the dry leaf, I got aromas of raisins and date bread.

I rinsed the tea and found the wet leaves gave off aromas of dried fruit on the gaiwan lid and damp earth on the leaves themselves. I steeped it starting wth ten seconds and increasing by five seconds each time, for eight steepings.

The first steeping had a light amber colored liquor and sweet malty aromas on the gaiwan lid, sweet and earthy aromas on the wet leaf, and a sweet fragrant aroma on the liquor itself. The mouthfeel was light, with a sweet and herbal flavor. The second steeping, some herbal aromas started coming out of the lid, while the leaf aroma settled into earthiness and a fruitcake and brandy aroma arose from the liquor itself. The liquor was slightly darker and had a rounder mouthfeel, with a spicy flavor reminiscent of alcohol.

By the third steeping, the bitterness started coming through. The lid and leaf aromas had taken on a henna aroma that I associate with raw puerh, and the liquor had a brandy aroma. The flavor had a pronounced but not unpleasant bitterness in the back of the throat with a floral and herbal quality to it, like hops. there was a little dried fruit in the flavor with no astringency and a syrupy mouthfeel.

On the fourth steeping, the bitterness mellowed and moved into the front of the mouth, with an almost umami savory quality to the flavor. The fifth steeping, I noticed more funky earthy aromas from the leaf and a purely bitter, non-sweet flavor from the liquor, with a tiny bit of dryness on the finish. The sixth and seventh steepings held steady with henna aromas and balanced bitterness with a dry finish. By the eighth steeping, it was still the same and I decided to finish the session.

The spent leaves were an even olive-green color and showed mostly broken leaves. I’m excited by this as a really excellent example of the delights of bitterness in a raw puerh, and I’m curious how the other samples compare.

Tuesday Tasting: Anji Bai Cha from Yunnan Sourcing

Today’s Tuesday Tasting is the Anji Bai Cha from Yunnan Sourcing. I first found this tea when I was researching an historical tea video and I found out that the tea called “Anji Bai Cha” in a primary source about Song Dynasty tribute tea actually referred to a green tea, despite the name “Bai Cha” meaning white tea. I learned that this prized cultivar was lost until the 1980s when a bush was discovered that was believed to be the same cultivar as the tea prized by the Emperor Huizong who wrote a vivid Treatise on Tea that described the practice of preparing tribute tea in the Song Dynasty. The tea was called “Bai Cha” because the raw leaves are so pale, and only turn green when they are heated to stop the oxidation process. So I bought some at Yunnan Sourcing to try, even though I knew I wouldn’t be pressing, roasting, and grinding it to prepare true Song-Dynasty-style tea.

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The first thing I noticed about this tea is the needle-y leaves. They are long and skinny, like the needles of a Douglass fir or white pine. I decided to steep it in gaiwan, gongfu style, but have since determined that it might be better to steep this tea in a method that is more suited to delicate green teas. But here, I will describe my gongfu tasting.

I used 5 grams in a 150-ml gaiwan with 170F water. From the dry leaf, I got some powerful vegetal aromas. I rinsed it and sniffed the wet leaf. The wet leaf aroma was sweet, herbal, and with a floral component that I guessed as sakura. It reminded me a lot of a Japanese sencha with sugared sakura leaves and dried sakura blossoms. I then steeped it starting with five seconds and increasing in five second increments.

 

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After the first steeping, the gaiwan lid smelled green and creamy while the wet leaf smelled of asparagus. The liquor was a pale jade color with a warm, sweet aroma. The mouthfeel was juicy with light brightness, and more of that sakura flavor. It got thicker and sweeter as it cooled off while I sipped. The second steeping was stronger, with stronger green aromas from the lid and sakura and asparagus aromas from the leaf. The liquor was still a pale jade, but had a spicy aroma that I guessed as clove. The mouthfeel was thicker, but still juicy and not cloying or syrupy, with tart, green flavors, like purslane.

The third steeping gave tarter aromas on the lid and nuttier on the leaf. The liquor had developed that clove or allspice aroma and the flavor was similar to the previous steeping. The fourth steeping had green floral aromas on the leaves and spicy aromas on the liquor with a slightly sweeter flavor. By the fifth steeping, the flavor had started to fade, and the aromas had gone somewhat spinach-y. The sixth steeping brought back that floral asparagus aroma with a lighter, but still present flavor. By the seventh steeping, I decided to steep it out for a minute and determined that the tea was done.

The spent leaves are only slightly lighter in color than the dry leaf, and still have a vivid spring green color. They are quite small, narrow leaves and have a deep crease down the center that is characteristic of the cultivar. While I thoroughly enjoyed this tea in gaiwan, join me this coming weekend for a video in which I share a session with steeped in a more traditional style for a green tea.

Tuesday Tasting: Tea Sparrow October 2019 Tea Box

NB: Tea Sparrow sent me their October box for free in exchange for posting a tasting. All thoughts are my own. Links are not affiliate links.

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This week, I’m sharing a bit of a different tasting. While I generally drink unflavored pure teas and often taste my teas gong fu style, I am a firm believer in evaluating teas on their own terms rather than trying to shoe-horn different teas into gongfucha. I was recently contacted by Tea Sparrow, a company that sells subscription tea boxes. Most of their teas are flavored, but everything is organic and natural and they use biodegradable packaging, so I was intrigued to try. Plus, I know plenty of my readers are not necessarily solely interested in drinking fussy pure teas and might appreciate knowing about some good flavored teas. They sent me their October box, which included two caffeine-free herbal teas, a flavored green tea, and a flavored black tea, so I thought I would do my tasting using their brewing parameters.

But of course, this isn’t a review; this is a tasting. So I still made sure to check aroma and look of the “leaf” at various points during the brewing. And I made a point to really roll the flavors around in my mouth, the way I would with any other tea. Let’s see how the October teas do with a full tea tasting.

Pina Colada Green Tea

I will admit, when I saw this tea, my first thought was

Anyone who reads this blog knows that not only am I not usually a fan of flavored teas, but “dessert-y” type flavors like this are at the bottom of my list of likes (top of my list of dislikes?). But this is a tasting, not a review, so here we go.

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Right off, I could smell the coconut through the package, and it had an almost sunscreen-y aroma, but as soon as I opened it and poured it out into a warmed teapot, the scent became this rich, very true coconut aroma. It’s actually a very warm scent, which is odd for what I thought would be a summery tea. The dry green tea is medium olive-ish green and has moderately small, straight and flat leaves. It almost looks like a Japanese green tea (or a Chinese green processed like a Japanese tea?). There are also pieces of sugared pineapple and flakes of toasted coconut. I tasted one of the pineapple pieces and it’s sweet and has taken on the coconut flavor.

I first steeped this tea using one tablespoon, which was 4.8g, in a 250-ml glass teapot with 180 F water for two minutes, as per the instructions. The wet leaf had an almost savory aroma and the liquor was pale gold with a light coconut aroma. The dominant flavor was green tea, with noticeable umami and a lightly astringent finish. The coconut was an undertone to the flavor, with no noticeable sweetness and a surprisingly warm flavor.

Out of curiosity, I took the same leaves and cold-brewed them for three hours. The cold-brewed liquor was buttery and fragrant with a more pronounced fruity flavor.

Organic Vanilla Mint Rooibos

They are not kidding when they say this tea is “peppermint forward.” Again, I could smell the peppermint through the package. The dry leaf is an obvious blend of rooibos and dried peppermint leaf. The dry leaf smells strongly of peppermint, but the addition of vanilla and rooibos adds a rich depth that reminded me of a York peppermint patty. In my notes, I put a parenthetical that it “clears your sinuses.”

I used one tablespoon, which was 4.4g, in a 12-oz. mug with boiling water for five minutes. The liquor is a deep reddish brown and has a distinct aroma of each individual component, rather than blasting your sinuses with menthol like the wet and dry leaf. Peppermint is still the strongest flavor and it is a menthol-y peppermint, not a green peppermint flavor. Rooibos is the second most prominent with a rich woody flavor and the vanilla is subtle and reads as chocolate to my tastebuds, without that weird artificial vanilla flavor that happens with vanilla-flavored teas.

Organic Crimson Currants

This was the first tea I tried from the box, the day it came, as my evening cup. I like to unwind with a warm beverage after I put Elliot to bed, and I get tired of lavender-chamomile. This is a blend of dried fruit, rosehips (which are also a fruit), rooibos, and lemongrass. You can see all the components in the dry “leaf.”

I steeped one tablespoon, which was 6.5g, in 250 ml of boiling water for five minutes. The liquor is a deep crimson color and has an almost thick look to it as it pours. It has the same fruity aroma as the dry leaf. I made a note that it looks like stage blood (corn syrup and red food coloring)! The first flavor that hits you is tart, probably from the rosehips and hibiscus. It’s a thicker tartness than hibiscus usually gives, but without the sickly, almost tomato-y flavor I sometimes get from rosehips. It has a syrupy mouthfeel but no actual sweet favor. There is a little bit of lemon-candy flavor from the lemongrass. The berries are very subtle and I didn’t taste any rooibos from this at all. My final note is that “this tea is what ‘Red Zinger’ wants to be.”

Organic Masala Chai

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This, I tasted both plain and with milk and honey, since masala chai is actually a drink made with tea, not just a tea, so the traditional drink involves dairy and sweetener. The dry leaf shows a lot of whole spices like clove and cardamom among the very typical-looking Indian tea leaves. I can definitely smell the cinnamon flavoring, as it had strong, sweet cinnamon scent, like Ceylon cinnamon, but the ginger is also present as a base note to the dry leaf aroma.

To start off, I brewed one tablespoon, which was 5.9g, in 250 ml of boiling water for five minutes. The liquor “smells like Christmas,” according to my notes. There is a strong cinnamon aroma. Interestingly enough, the flavor is not overly cinnamon-y. The ginger comes through nicely and I get a little of the cardamom. It has a spicy finish, but the dominant flavor is from the Assam, with a big malt flavor, currant notes, and not too much tannin.

Adding honey to it brought out the cinnamon, and milk brings out an almost chocolatey quality. I also re-steeped this with boiling water for five minutes, giving it a little stir, and found that the ginger and cardamom were more pronounced, even when I added honey.

So there are my tastings of the four teas that came in the Tea Sparrow October 2019 box. And if you like flavored teas and are interested in trying a box, or buying any of these teas on their web store, you can use the code “TeaLeavesandTweed” on their site for a 20% discount on your first order or your first month of the subscription.

Tuesday Tasting: Mystery Oolong from Yunnan Sourcing

This Tuesday’s tasting is a tea I found in my tea cupboard that I cannot link to because I don’t know precisely which tea it is! I know it came from Yunnan Sourcing, in my oolong tea subscription box, and was from Autumn 2018, but beyond that, I have only what I can glean from my eyes, nose, and tongue because I accidentally cut off most of the label when I opened the packet.

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You can see that it is a rolled oolong that has a bit of roast and oxidation on it. The leaves are obviously rolled, but super tightly like some oolongs. I used 5g in a 120-ml gaiwan and steeped it at 190F. I rinsed and then steeped, starting with 15 seconds and increased each steeping by five seconds (except for the seventh and the ninth).

From the dry leaf, I got aromas of pipe tobacco, roasted nuts, and a faint bit of woodsmoke. After the rinse, the wet leaf smelled creamy, with notes of caramel and leather, and just a little cannabis. After the first steeping, the lid of the gaiwan smelled of toasted hazelnuts while the wet leaf smelled of spent firewood. The liquor was a medium amber-gold color and smelled of tobacco. It had a creamy mouthfeel with flavors of browned butter and a maple syrup aftertaste. The empty cup had the aroma of vanilla and wood.

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The second steeping gave a slightly richer color liquor that had more roasted aromas coming through. The lid and leaf both smelled of charcoal while the liquor still smelled of tobacco. The flavor had a bit more tartness or tannin with a bit of mineral dryness and a sweet finish. The mouthfeel was custardy and I got sandalwood on the finish. The third steeping had more sweetness still, with the same roasted and tobacco aromas.

On the fourth steeping, I noticed a cedar smoke aroma. The flavors were much lighter and I noticed I was feeling some body warmth. By the fifth steeping, the aroma seemed to be fading, along with the flavor, but I still noticed a biscuit flavor and a very smooth finish. The sixth steeping brought out charred flavors: charred meat on the aroma and a charred oak flavor, like a whisky. The seventh steeping I actually only steeped for maybe 20 seconds because I forgot to wait for it to steep before straining it. I got more of a meaty flavor, almost like a stew from this steeping.

By the eighth steeping, it seemed pretty done, though I still got that characteristic tobacco aroma, so I did a ninth and final steeping for 90 seconds, which gave the last bits of a smoky, meaty aroma and left me feeling a bit jittery.

Oddly enough, the spent leaf was a deep green color, not brown like the dry leaf and roast would suggest. It was the color of pickled grape leaves. They were still quite shriveled and upon inspecting them closer, there were no fully intact leaves. A final sniff of the leaves brought out aromas of spinach or kale and a light marine aroma.

Perhaps in the future, I would be able to actually identify a tea from such a tasting. Any guesses?

Tuesday Tasting: Storm King Tea Bai Mudan

This Tuesday, I’m finishing off the last of a tea that came as part of a sampler I purchased on Amazon last year from Storm King Tea. I’ve featured other teas from them over the last year, but, as I’ve written before, I’ve had a bit of a difficult relationship with Bai Mudan, or white peony. So I thought it might be a good idea to sit down and actually do a full, detailed tasting to see what I get. Plus, I had the packet out for my matcha experiments, and I had just enough leaf leftover for a gongfu session.

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I brewed 5.5 grams in my 120-ml gaiwan with 180F water. I started on an empty stomach, but the session ended up stretching all day, so I had some food starting with bread and butter after the first infusion.

The dry leaf is a mix of olive-green-to-brown leaves and silvery fuzzy buds. There is an aroma of sweetgrass and fresh hay from the dry leaf. After a rinse, I get an intense white floral aroma off the leaves, which I interpreted as jasmine. I steeped the tea ten times, starting with ten seconds and increasing by five seconds each subsequent steeping.

The aroma of the first steeping was floral from the gaiwan lid with something a bit deeper, and cannabis-like from the leaf itself. The liquor was a medium apricot gold color with a fruity aroma. It had a light juicy mouthfeel and tasted of tannin and fruit, like persimmons, with a creamy undertone. During the second steeping, some apricot fruity aromas joined the floral aromas, with more fruity tannin on the flavors. The second steeping was the only one that almost skewed a bit harsh, tasting a bit like perfume.

By the third steeping, it had calmed down and the floral aromas dominated. It had a less dry mouthfeel and went back to juicy. There was a little tingle on the tongue, similar to what I experience from infusions of very good medicinal herbs. I noticed the aromas had faded a bit on the fourth infusion, and some fresh, raw peachy flavors came through.

I thought the fifth infusion would be the last, but from the fifth through the tenth infusion, this tea held remarkably steady. I did note that the sixth infusion had an aroma that was very similar to “white tea” scented things, particularly one of the GapScents from the 90s (was it “Cloud” or “Heaven” that had green tea as a note?). There was no unpleasant astringency. But by the tenth infusion, while the aroma was still lovely, the flavor was pretty much done. Not bad for a white tea I bought off Amazon on a whim.

Tuesday Tasting: Tea Tasting versus Tea Reviewing, plus Yunnan Sourcing Mengku Grade 3 Ripe Puerh mini tuo cha

Reviews are a cornerstone of many blogging universes, and this blog hasn’t been very different. Some of my most popular posts are reviews (mostly of beauty products), and recently, a large portion of my posts have been tea reviews. But lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about the idea of “reviewing” something like tea, which is so beholden to the reviewer’s personal tastes.

That said, of course I’m going to keep sharing my thoughts on teas I’m tasting. Have no fear. But I think I shall structure my thoughts as tea tastings rather than tea reviews. It may seem a silly distinction, but here is my rationale: flavors that I enjoy, you might not, and vice versa. I think my video on the immensely popular Lapsang Souchong is proof enough of that. So rather than “review” teas that come my way, either as gifts or my own purchases, I shall sit down and do a long tasting session, taking careful notes, so that I can share the impressions I get of the flavors and aromas I get from the tea. Hopefully, that way, it will provide some benefit beyond just “I liked this tea” or “I didn’t like this tea.” And it means that there’s no such thing as a positive or negative review. Just a tasting.

For now, I’m going to be very ambitious and try to do a tasting every Tuesday. And occasionally, I may also post about some topics relevant to tea tasting. I will say, this is my way of becoming more serious about my tea, without taking a formal class, so you should know that I merely have a lot of feelings about tea, rather than any real training. I take my descriptions from my experiences with perfumes, wine, cooking, and other hobbies of mine.

So if you are interested in knowing details of my tasting notes, stay tuned. And if you happen to sell tea and wish to offer up a tea for tasting, let me know through the contact form.

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Today’s tasting is of the 2011 Mengku Grade 3 Ripe Puer mini tuo cha I received as a free sample in one of my recent orders from Yunnan Sourcing. While the tea was provided free of charge, it was a normal sample-with-purchase rather than one provided for promotional reasons.

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I used one 4.7-gram tuo cha in a 120-ml gaiwan with boiling filtered water. I rinsed the tea, and then steeped this eight times, starting at 10 seconds and increasing by five seconds for each steeping, and then finished with a ninth steeping for one minute.

The dry tuo cha is quite compact, with a very subtle earthy scent after being warmed in the gaiwan. Upon rinsing, the leaves released a light aroma of wet earth.

After the first steeping, the gaiwan lid held the light aroma of petrichor and damp earth and the wet leaf itself smelled more strongly of earth. The liquor smelled of mushrooms and was a surprisingly light rosy amber color. The flavor of the first steeping was surprisingly sweet, with notes of Biscoff, brown sugar, and maple syrup.

The second steeping brought out a slightly darker color, like Grade B maple syrup. The wet leaf smelled of forest floor while the gaiwan lid brought out a sweeter woody aroma that took me some time to place. I believe I eventually settled on some sort of aromatic wood or liquorice root. The mouthfeel was noticeably creamy, with a little less sweetness and more fruit. It had jammy apricot notes and custard, so I noted a flavor of apricot tart.

During the third steeping, I was still trying to place the lid aroma. The liquor was much darker and started developing that rich, dark earthy flavor that I associate with ripe puer, though it still had some sweetness. By the fourth steeping, I had placed that the lid aroma was some sort of sweetly aromatic wood, though not spicy like sandalwood. I also noted that the tuo cha had started to noticeably come apart. The sweetness of the liquor had died down a bit, but it paradoxically retained a very smooth chocolatey flavor, almost like milk chocolate without sweetness, or perhaps like Crio Bru brewed cacao.

By the fifth steeping, I was starting to notice a bit of warmth in my body and was feeling rather good. Despite drinking on an empty stomach first thing in the morning, I had no stomach upset. The fifth steeping was the deep, dark color that I associate with ripe puer — almost like coffee — and the aromas were all sweet woods and earth, with some mulchiness in the wet leaf itself. I, very poetically, wrote that the liquor “tastes like the forest on a rainy day.” I then went on to wonder if there was such a thing as “poetic cha qi” and noted that I feel like lounging around like a cat. It had a very substantial, chocolatey mouthfeel and the tuo cha had completely come apart.

The sixth steeping had the same earthy aromas and dark liquor, though the flavors were somewhat muted. The color of the liquor had started to fade again at the seventh infusion, but still had strong earthy aromas and the leaf almost smelled of firewood. The flavors brought forward minerals — iron and salt. The eighth steeping looked very similar to the second steeping, with a little return of that woody sweetness. It was here that I identified liquorice root in the flavor. By the ninth steeping, I decided it was pretty much done, though with some pleasant lingering sweetness.

Upon examining the spent leaf, I noticed a fair amount of sticks. The overall mass of leaf was very dark, with little color variation.