Beauty Review: invi+apotheke Peat Hair and Body Travel Kit

I thought I’d kick off the beginning of my Scottish Honeymoon Recap by reviewing a set of products that I specifically saved to take with me. I received the invi+apotheke Hair and Body Travel Kit from Beautibi as part of the aNEW box a few months ago, and the peat-infused products seemed like a perfect kit to bring with me to the land of peat and whisky.

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The brand invi+apotheke is a 100% natural hair and body care brand from Korea that uses peat extracts in their products because of its supposed antioxidant activity from plant sterols in the peat matter. I know that peat makes my garden happy and my whisky delicious, so I was intrigued. The fact that the products are sulfate-free was icing on the cake, as I try to avoid sulfates due to personal sensitivities. Plus, all the products are pH-balanced to be between pH 4.5-5.5, which is ideal for skin and scalp. Personally, I find my body and scalp just as finicky as my face when it comes to pH.

So, armed with these adorable bottles of black and grey goo, I made my way to Scotland to get a picture of peat in its natural habitat. Of course, I didn’t manage to hike an actual peat bog, but I did get a nice glamour shot at Inverness Castle. Duly recorded, I figured I could crack them open.

These products do not mess around with peat extract. The hair and body cleansers are both deep black in color, and the hair treatment is a satisfyingly dingy grey color that suggests that peat is a large part of the formula. They also have an earthy, herbal smell, although, as one Redditor noted to their dismay, they do not smell of peaty whisky. Nevertheless, I found them quite pleasant, if possibly a bit of a polarizing scent (Mr. Tweed was not so convinced, but still used them).

The cleansers are quite gentle and all three products are pretty thin in texture, making for an interesting first day when I dumped out a handful of hair cleanser to wash my hair. They need to be shaken before use, but other than that I find they lather as well as any of my other sulfate-free shampoos, and provide gentle cleansing. The treatment felt a bit lightweight, but I didn’t have any trouble with hair dryness, so it did the trick, although it might not have served me pre-haircut.

While I would probably be tempted to repurchase full sizes of the products, they are tricky to find. Beautibi doesn’t carry them. I will also note that, while I like a bit of gentle cleansing for my hair, I did find my hair started to feel a bit gunky after nine days in Scotland with nothing else stronger. I would probably want to use a weekly clarifying shampoo and use these the rest of the time. But it was nice for days when we came home sweaty and I wanted to wash my hair on consecutive days.

All in all, I enjoyed these products. I wish they were a bit easier to find in full sizes, though.

NB: I purchased these products with my own money and have not been given any incentive to review them. There are no affiliate links in this review, but you can access my affiliate links here.

Custom-Blended Hair Oil from NightBlooming

Many years ago, I had quite long hair, and I spent much of my time beautifying and fussing over it. I poured over articles and researched how to wash it, condition it, pamper it, and style it. I spent rather exhorbitant amounts of money on toys to put it up most beautifully. And then, I cut most of it off and went for years with short hair. I got rid of most of my hair toys and spent very little time worrying about my hair, unless it was sticking straight up or my scalp was itchy. That said, there were some pieces I could never abandon. These came from NightBlooming.

Years ago, Melissa at NightBlooming on Etsy made the most beautiful embellished hair sticks and accessories I have ever seen. Her designs have a fantasy aesthetic, inspired by the natural world and mythologies. Wearing a NightBlooming creation makes you feel like an ethereal fairy princess goddess, and even when I had a pixie hair cut, there were sticks she made me that I just couldn’t let go.

Since then, she’s branched out and now spends much of her energy blending natural hair care products. I had tried some of her original salve and oil before cutting my hair. Indeed, her Triple Moon Anointing oil was my first foray into the world of hair oils. But she’s truly blossomed her mixology into a whole new side of her business.

Having recently returned to growing my hair long and desirous of a new hair oil, I decided to try out a new item she offers: custom-blended hair oil. I knew I wanted something that smelled amazing, but I also needed a luxurious oil. Because my skin likes lighter, high-linoleic acids, and my hair likes heavier, high-oleic acids, I had very little in my oil arsenal that was truly nice for my hair. So I had her blend me up jojoba oil fortified with argan oil, and scent it with a heady blend of florals, frankincense, and vetiver. It’s a deep, dark, old-fashioned scent, but I love it. The best part is that she offers this service for a very reasonable cost, particularly considering I probably chose all her most expensive essential oils in an expensive base oil blend.

It took her about a day to blend the oil, and another couple days for it to ship. Immediately upon seeing the package in the mail, I tore into it and opened the oil. It smelled heavenly. I rubbed one drop on my hand and kept sniffing it until the scent dissipated in an hour or so. The next time I wet my hair, I applied three drops to the ends. It absorbs nicely and locks in all that lovely moisture from the water, but doesn’t leave my hair feeling oily. I can also use a bit more if I want to pre-treat my hair before bed when I’m going to wash it the next day. I find using a bit of oil on the ends of my hair makes them feel silkier and I don’t feel the need to trim as often.

For those who are worried about blending their own oil, NightBlooming offers a monthly oil blend that she designs for specific hair needs. She keeps the blend notes around so customers can just order a monthly blend instead of dreaming up their own blend and worrying that it won’t be what they want. She’s also lovely to interact with, if you want advice about growing long, beautiful hair. She’s been growing her hair for a long time and it’s truly lovely. I highly recommend giving her shop a look.

I also ordered a packet of herbal conditioning powder, based on the herb Zizyphus Spina Christi, with aloe, nettles, and wheatgrass added in for strength. It’s supposed to be a fortifying hair treatment, similar to henna, but without any color stain. Despite the dark color of my natural hair, I’ve started avoiding things that color because I have enough silver strands that they get dingy otherwise. I plan on having a lovely “hair spa” day some coming weekend to try it out!

A New Endeavor

I hinted at a new craft project I’ve taken up in my last post, but I didn’t give any details. Well, here’s the big reveal:

AllSoaps

Last week, I made my first batch of cold-process soap!

I’ve been interested in soap-making for years now, but never took the plunge. At first, I wanted to make an unscented olive oil soap for a family member who had very sensitive skin. But as the years went on, I’ve realized that some of the best fats for soap-making are the local, traditional animal fats I can get from farmers around me. Of course, this appealed to my vintage sensibilities and I’ve spent some time researching both vintage soap recipes and modern soap research.

That, coupled with my new attempts at all-natural hair and skin care, let me to more actively look up what I would need to start making bars of homemade soap using lard and tallow. Eventually, maybe I can make a bar of soap that serves all my showerly needs, hair and skin alike!

I started out with a basic recipe mostly based on lard, but with just enough coconut oil to provide nice lather and cleansing power. I had meant to try using tallow, but the store was out of it. I also made a bar with mostly olive oil and just enough coconut to provide lather to put away to cure for holiday gifts for those whose sensibilities might be offended by animal-based soaps.

Both recipes went smoothly, and I’ve just cut up the second batch yesterday. My first batch was a small, 1-lb. batch that I poured into silicone muffin cups to mold. They make very cute soaps. But I wanted something more traditional for gifts so I poured the soaps into a square silicone pan and cut it into rectangular bars.

I’m very excited about my new hobby, and hopefully will be able to test my new soaps on myself and Boyfriend in the next few weeks. And then, I have lots of other recipes planned, from a luxurious facial care bar, to a bar using sheep tallow! I’ll report back here with each and every batch, though.